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Walking along the great Prospect

I started from wanting to simplify the landscape to understand it better. To do this, I wanted to exploit to the point of exasperation the instrument of human vision par excellence: the geometric perspective. The aim of this medium is to rationalise space and make it knowable; in particular, I focused on what man has not created with his own hands, or at least not all the way through, which is the natural one. Applying this type of vision, the landscape has become so simplified that it has become rarefied and unnaturalized until it is no longer recognizable. I wanted to compare the two macro dimensions of the human being and the natural landscape, focusing on how man looks at something that is almost alien to him because it escapes his total control and therefore, in an attempt to understand it, arrives at making it abstract like spots of colour on a canvas.
This thought has been latent in my photographs for some years now and I have found it again by looking back at some of my old images, so it can also be extended to other places I have studied, which is why I still consider it a project in development.

 

Walking along the great Prospect of our city, I mentally erase the elements I have decided not to take into consideration. I pass a ministry building, whose façade is laden with caryatids, columns, balustrades, plinths, brackets, metopes; and I feel the need to reduce it to a smooth vertical surface, a slab of opaque glass, a partition that defines space without imposing itself on one’s sight. [...] The world is so complicated, tangled, and overloaded that to see into it with any clarity you must prune and prune.

Italo Calvino, Se una notte d'inverno un viaggiatore, 1979

2016 - on going


I started from wanting to simplify the landscape to understand it better. To do this, I wanted to exploit to the point of exasperation the instrument of human vision par excellence: the geometric perspective. The aim of this medium is to rationalise space and make it knowable; in particular, I focused on what man has not created with his own hands, or at least not all the way through, which is the natural one. Applying this type of vision, the landscape has become so simplified that it has become rarefied and unnaturalized until it is no longer recognizable. I wanted to compare the two macro dimensions of the human being and the natural landscape, focusing on how man looks at something that is almost alien to him because it escapes his total control and therefore, in an attempt to understand it, arrives at making it abstract like spots of colour on a canvas.
This thought has been latent in my photographs for some years now and I have found it again by looking back at some of my old images, so it can also be extended to other places I have studied, which is why I still consider it a project in development.

 

Walking along the great Prospect of our city, I mentally erase the elements I have decided not to take into consideration. I pass a ministry building, whose façade is laden with caryatids, columns, balustrades, plinths, brackets, metopes; and I feel the need to reduce it to a smooth vertical surface, a slab of opaque glass, a partition that defines space without imposing itself on one’s sight. [...] The world is so complicated, tangled, and overloaded that to see into it with any clarity you must prune and prune.

Italo Calvino, Se una notte d'inverno un viaggiatore, 1979

2016 - on going

Iceland

Italy

Chile